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The Coach Builders’ and Wheelwrights' Art Journal 1901 

Plate 1113 Gentleman's Driving Phaeton.

Plate 1113 Gentleman's Driving Phaeton.

First published in 1880 as The Coach Builders’, Harness Makers’ and Saddlers’ Art Journal this periodical underwent a number of title changes to reflect the growing interest in the motor car and by 1901 was featuring illustrations of motor vehicles alongside those of the more traditional horse-drawn carriage such as the two colour plates shown here of a Gentleman’s Driving Phaeton and a Panhard Phaeton Motor Car.

Introduced in the 18th century and named after a character in Greek mythology, the four-wheeled horse-drawn Phaeton was a light carriage with open sides in front of the seat. The Highflyer, an extreme form made popular by George IV when he was Prince of Wales could be viewed as the sports car of its day, the horse-drawn equivalent of a Jaguar E-Type or Aston Martin DB4. Young men drove their Phaetons with great dash at high speeds with their groom or 'tiger' perched up on the seat behind them.

Plate 1061 Panhard Phaeton motor car.

Plate 1061 Panhard Phaeton motor car.

The Panhard Phaeton motor car clearly shows the influence of the horse-drawn vehicle of the same name with similar sized wheels, bodywork and rear seat. It is just one of the many body types that owed its origin to earlier carriage styles including the Brougham, Cabriolet, Dogcart, Landaulet, Victoria, Vis-à-vis and Wagonette to name a few.

 

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